Install this theme

from89:

Graffiti on the Walls of Abandoned Buildings by Odeith

You Can Also Find Me -:

Skumar’s :- Twitter | Facebook | We Heart It | Pinterest | Subscribe

Other Blog :- India Incredible | Facebook

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do.

Our Only Hope Will Come Through Rebellion

disciplesofmalcolm:

"Where do we go from here: Chaos or Community?" by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1967).
Not very many people seem to know this, as is typical in a country who’s own educational system and mass media keeps it’s own citizens ignorant about their own heroes, that Martin Luther King Jr. was also an author. He wrote several books, this being his last one from 1967.
This book definitely reveals the true Martin Luther King, not the one the power structure tells us about. He touches on many topics, such as history, the hypocritical approach of the U.S. government when it comes to the question of race, the physical and psychological horrors of African life in America, and the unjust, immoral obsession America has with war. These are some among other topics he discusses.
Around the end of his life, King saw the inability and unwillingness of the American government to enforce any of the laws that were meant to help stop racial discrimination of African people in America and others abroad. Ultimately, he took a stand against the war in Vietnam, which turned him into an enemy of the white house, and attempted to start a second march on Washington against the federal government called the Poor People’s Campaign for economic justice (this was neutralized by his assassination). Slowly he came to realize and say with his own words that the dream he had spoken about had turned into a nightmare. During his last few hours alive, he said, as a result of his frustration with the system of racism getting no better, that “we’ve got some difficult days ahead.”
"I’ve come upon something that disturbs me deeply. We have fought hard and long for integration, as I believe we should have, and I know that we will win. But I’ve come to believe we’re integrating into a burning house." (1)
Taken from the back cover:
“We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time. Life often leaves us standing bare, naked and defected with a lost opportunity. The ‘tide in the affairs of men’ does not remain at the flood; it ebbs. We may cry out desperately for time to pause in her passage, but time is deaf to every plea and rushes on. Over the bleached bones and jumbled residues of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words: “Too late.” We still may have a choice today. This may well be mankind’s last chance to choose between chaos and community.”
This is essential reading for anyone who is studying King and his contributions.

disciplesofmalcolm:

"Where do we go from here: Chaos or Community?" by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1967).

Not very many people seem to know this, as is typical in a country who’s own educational system and mass media keeps it’s own citizens ignorant about their own heroes, that Martin Luther King Jr. was also an author. He wrote several books, this being his last one from 1967.

This book definitely reveals the true Martin Luther King, not the one the power structure tells us about. He touches on many topics, such as history, the hypocritical approach of the U.S. government when it comes to the question of race, the physical and psychological horrors of African life in America, and the unjust, immoral obsession America has with war. These are some among other topics he discusses.

Around the end of his life, King saw the inability and unwillingness of the American government to enforce any of the laws that were meant to help stop racial discrimination of African people in America and others abroad. Ultimately, he took a stand against the war in Vietnam, which turned him into an enemy of the white house, and attempted to start a second march on Washington against the federal government called the Poor People’s Campaign for economic justice (this was neutralized by his assassination). Slowly he came to realize and say with his own words that the dream he had spoken about had turned into a nightmare. During his last few hours alive, he said, as a result of his frustration with the system of racism getting no better, that “we’ve got some difficult days ahead.”

"I’ve come upon something that disturbs me deeply. We have fought hard and long for integration, as I believe we should have, and I know that we will win. But I’ve come to believe we’re integrating into a burning house." (1)

Taken from the back cover:

We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time. Life often leaves us standing bare, naked and defected with a lost opportunity. The ‘tide in the affairs of men’ does not remain at the flood; it ebbs. We may cry out desperately for time to pause in her passage, but time is deaf to every plea and rushes on. Over the bleached bones and jumbled residues of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words: “Too late.” We still may have a choice today. This may well be mankind’s last chance to choose between chaos and community.

This is essential reading for anyone who is studying King and his contributions.

Totalitarianism, now brought to you by corporations